Recent Blog Post


© Jeffrey Marcus, 2015 | Site implemented by HEAVE
9th of March

Miracles


I like to believe that life is composed of miracles. Because if it isn’t … then life is totally random. I’m not talking of the miracles that happen once in a blue moon (winning the lottery, fully recovering from cancer, etc.), but the miracles that happen every day (we wake up in the morning refreshed, our brains don’t explode from a cerebral hemorrhage, our body moves air through the trachea into the lungs at which point the hemoglobin in the red blood cells carry oxygen to the heart then returns the carbon dioxide to the lungs so it can be exhaled). Miracles are happening to us every moment of every day. So, if you accept this premise that we are existing in a constant flow of miracles – then where you are in any given moment is exactly where you are supposed to be.
I am always amazed at the miracle of who finds my acting classes and how. I also am always heartened by the exclamations of “how did you know to give me this scene, it is exactly what is going on in my life at this moment”??!!! I think that scenes, auditions and acting jobs come to us at the perfect moment to reflect to us where we are in our lives, IF we can acknowledge them as such. I also think our scene partners and fellow actors come to us at the perfect moment to be our teachers. If we are aware that pleasurable (or not so pleasurable) partners are there to teach us a lesson (or we are there to teach them a lesson), then we begin to acknowledge the sacred that is always happening in our lives.

If we can acknowledge the sacred in our work, then we bring that same sense of sacredness to our audiences. If we are aware of the miraculous in our lives, then we bring that awareness of the miracles to our audiences

There are 4 comments on this post
Categories:  Blog Uncategorized
3rd of November

Life in Reverse


In real life, we often feel an impulse or a desire, and then act upon it with words or actions. For example… I’m feeling unloved and I want a kiss – so I ask you for one, or I bat my eyes seductively (why do people think eye-batting works… people just laugh at me). I feel tired and I want a cup of coffee – so I order one at Starbucks or brew a pot. You get the idea. Feeling results in impulse – creating words or actions.

In acting life, we are given the action or words and have to fill in the feelings and impulses.

Paul: Sally, would you grab me a cup of coffee?

… is what the writer gives us. We then have to choose the feeling: tired, thirsty, hungover or a million other possibilities. We also have to make the action: to “order”, “to plead”, “to demand”, “to charm” or a million other etc.. We are creating lives in reverse! We are given the tip of the iceberg, and must create the iceberg. The lovely side effect is that we are creating ourselves in the likeness of the character. As Ms. Stella Adler said “Character is defined through action”.

Please, please, please do not listen to the hacks that say the above line of dialogue is a “throwaway”. Most writers have labored countless hours over their work. They have ruthlessly hacked off any limbs that weren’t absolutely necessary. They have reduced a full life into two hours (or one hour for a TV series) and if it’s in the script – it’s there for a reason. Otherwise it would have been “thrown away” by the writer.

The reason that we want to create our lives in reverse when we act, is so that the structure is firm enough that we no longer have to think about it. When it comes time to perform – we can let go and fly. Any magician knows that it takes time to create the illusion of magic. We want it to look easy to the audience. Unfortunately, many actors think it is just easy. And that, my friends, is why people watch reality TV.

There are 2 comments on this post
Categories:  Blog Uncategorized

Are you interested in more information?


We’re always excited about new students who are ready to manifest their dreams!

If you think you are ready to make the leap into the next level,
email me or give me a call at (323) 965-9392.